Beekeeper’s Internal Communications App Ranked #59 on Prestigious SaaS 1000 List

Beekeeper’s Internal Communications App Ranked #59 on Prestigious SaaS 1000 List

We’re excited to announce that our internal communications app, Beekeeper, is officially listed on SaaS 1000, a prestigious index of SaaS companies algorithmically ranked by a number of growth indicators such as hiring trends and team expansion rates. Lead411 founder Tom Blue began compiling the SaaS 1000 list as a way for him to index growing SaaS companies in a data-driven way. As the SaaS product landscape continues to expand, lists like the SaaS 1000 are incredibly useful tools for SaaS pros to evaluate the groundbreaking trends that will shape our industry for years to come.

“The Beekeeper team’s international impact on frontline workforce internal communications is an indicator of their continued growth. We are excited to see them climb the ranks of SaaS 1000 and to see what the company has in store for the future.” – Tom Blue, Founder, SaaS 1000

As a rapidly growing startup, we are honored to be recognized among so many incredible peers solving critical technological problems throughout the SaaS industry. As reported by SaaS 1000, our team has experienced a 27.71% growth over the past six months alone. In fact, we recently celebrated our 100 employee milestone, with team members working across our offices in San Francisco, Zurich, London, and Berlin. Over the course of 2018, we are projected to double in size worldwide. As our 4.9 rating on Glassdoor reflects, our organization is deeply committed to building a strong company culture that enables our employees to flourish.

Beekeeper 100 employees

“We are honored to be included on the SaaS 1000 list, and look forward to growing our team with strategic hires in order execute our vision to unite and engage frontline and corporate employees on one streamlined platform.” -Cris Grossmann, CEO, Beekeeper

We are very proud of the strategic additions we have made to our team, including our recently appointed Head of Hospitality Andrada Paraschiv, Global Head of Hospitality Sales Connie Rheams, and a number of talented software engineers. These hires have allowed the Beekeeper family to double down on some exciting product expansions that have helped our clients amp up employee engagement efforts.

Expansions to the Beekeeper team communication app Marketplace, launched in Fall 2017, continues to be a major focus for our team as we lean more heavily into integrating with operational tools. Our upcoming additions of ADP and SAP integrations will allow our customers to streamline payroll, scheduling, analytics, and IT solutions within Beekeeper. Our software engineers continue to hone in on our AI as well with features like chatbots. As we aspire to continue climbing the SaaS 1000 list, we’re excited to continue welcoming talented members to our team to help the Beekeeper platform and culture grow.

Interested in hearing more about how the Beekeeper internal communication app can improve communications and operations among your growing workforce? Fill out the form below to schedule a demo.



Former Customer Andrada Paraschiv Heads Beekeeper's New Hospitality Division

Former Customer Andrada Paraschiv Heads Beekeeper’s New Hospitality Division

Andrada Paraschiv was the Executive Director of Communications and Strategy when the company consulted Beekeeper to help overcome significant internal communications challenges after a major reorganization. Parent company FRHI, a global hospitality management company, wanted to centralize internal communications for their three hotel brands, Fairmont, Raffles, and Swissôtel. A primary initial challenge was to find an internal communications solution to bring the nearly 50,000 frontline employees working together as one dispersed, yet united, team.

Beekeeper Employee App Solves Internal Communication and Employee Connection Challenges

In 2013, FRHI had recently undergone reorganization as part of the reorganization process. As Paraschiv recalls, Beekeeper’s team communication tools proved the natural choice to create, “a feeling of one company, one FRHI. We were trying to bring our three hotel brands under this one umbrella. We thought that Beekeeper presented an opportunity to have one place where our team members could showcase their news, achievements, and ideas.”

FRHI team communication app

Prior to adopting the Beekeeper digital workforce app, Paraschiv and FRHI’s leadership and frontline employees were accustomed to communicating exclusively with their company’s teams using traditional internal communication methods such as emails, newsletters, and phone calls. The reorganization brought these cross-property employee engagement and internal communication challenges to the forefront.

Paraschiv saw the potential of Beekeeper as an employee-focused app committed not only to unified internal communications and employee connection, but to mobile collaboration. With the flexibility of Beekeeper’s employee app, around-the-clock accessibility was possible, ensuring that FRHI’s many frontline employees and teams could remain connected in 35 countries, and speaking 22 languages, across time zones, shift calendars, and locations.

The Employee Engagement Benefits and Highly Visual Elements of Beekeeper That Won Her Over

Another key benefit of Beekeeper that appealed to Paraschiv was the highly visual nature of the employee app, essential for FRHI’s international mobile workforce. Through FRHI Talk, chefs could capture culinary offerings as they were made and post photos, menus, and relevant dining information for the entire on-site team—or for teams at other FRHI properties to enjoy and be inspired by.

Best of all, since Beekeeper works across mobile and desktop devices, FRHI leadership, management, and frontline employee teams can communicate, contribute, and engage on-site, on-the-go, and wherever their busy work days take them. Live streams on digital signage in break rooms and other frontline employee gathering spaces provides yet another internal communication layer for the entire FRHI team.

From Beekeeper Customer to Beekeeper Executive Team Member

The increased employee engagement and internal communication numbers after implementing FRHI Talk speak for themselves: about a year into deployment of their employee app, workforce adoption of FRHI Talk soared to 98%. In fact, FRHI was the 2015 recipient of Ragan’s Employee Communications Award for Best Employee Engagement using Beekeeper.

After witnessing first-hand from the customer perspective the transformative effect of Beekeeper’s employee app on both internal communication and employee connection at FRHI, Paraschiv later joined Beekeeper in October 2017 in a newly created role as Head of Hospitality.

In this new role, Paraschiv leads the Beekeeper Hospitality Division to support the increasing demand for better internal communication and employee connection for dispersed workforces. Paraschiv recently led a hospitality expert panel at the National HR in Hospitality Conference and Expo (HRIH) with the Beekeeper team in March 2018, in Las Vegas, NV that broke attendance records for the morning session of the conference.

To download the full FRHI case study, complete the form below.



Bee School Leadership and Followership QA

Bee School Session 6: “Leadership and Followership” Q&A

Class is dismissed! Sadly, Bee School has ended with Dr. Herkenhoff’s lecture on “Leadership and Followership,” but we have a few more insights to share. This educational series has been a great success and we couldn’t have done it without your participation!

Leadership

In the final session titled “Leadership and Followership,” Dr. Herkenhoff explains the qualities of each, why they are essential, and how to improve in both areas. First, she dives into leadership—the act of guiding and directing others. She explains the differences between formal and informal leadership, and identifies the four types of leaders with examples, pros, and cons of each.

Leadership Styles

leadership styles

Expanding on her last lecture on “Emotional Intelligence,” she reveals her research findings that good leaders have the technical know-how and high IQ, but great leaders have those and a high EQ. That is the ultimate differentiator, along with knowing how to build communities.

Below are what she deems as the most important leadership skills:

  • Tolerance for ambiguity
  • Frazzle factor (stress)
  • Risk-taking
  • Feedback
  • Remember: People join companies, but leave managers. Be a great manager and you will retain your people.

    Followership

    On the flip side of leadership, followership is the process of being guided and directed. Many people consider the term “follower” as negative, but that it simply not the case. Effective followers have the power to improve organizations and influence their leaders. We are all followers at some point, so these skills are essential for each and every one of us.

    The professor outlines the four types of followers and pros and cons of each to prove her case.

    Type of Followers
    Types of Followers

    There were two great questions asked during the presentation and below are Dr. Herkenhoff’s responses. If you have any further questions or feedback about Bee School, or want us to send you the recording, email us at beeschool@beekeeper.io.

    Q&A with the Professor

    1. Do good leaders need to be good followers?

    Absolutely. Being a good follower doesn’t make you a sheep. There are many traits learned as a follower that make better leaders.

    Collaboration is the key to success. Leaders who have learned how to work with people and bring out the best in them will create a strong culture and have an easier time motivating teams to accomplish goals. Similar to collaboration, diplomacy means knowing how to get along with those who have differences while not ignoring those differences. Leaders can’t afford to be oblivious to the attitudes surrounding them.

    It is this awareness that is learned while being a follower that allows leaders to take into account their various audiences including colleagues, board members, customers, and coworkers. A good leader knows each of their stakeholder groups well enough to know what it will take to bring them along for the ride.

    Collaboration, diplomacy, and awareness are great, but critical thinking and knowing when to stand up to their leaders is an admirable trait learned as a follower. It is this motivation, intelligence, and competence that inspires followership.

    Standing up to your leaders at every point in your career when you think things are heading in the wrong direction takes courage. This requires critical thinking and awareness of the situation to get your point across with the conviction and energy needed to change what is wrong, as well as support a leader or manager who is doing things well.

    2. What is the best process for delivering and receiving feedback?

    Delivering feedback is one of the most difficult things for people to do, so when you receive feedback, the first thing you should say is “thank you.” The courage that it takes to give any feedback is significant. The fact someone took the time and effort to make you better deserves to be treated with appreciation.

    After receiving feedback and thanking the person, take a minute to reflect and do your best to remove your personal emotions from any response. If you need more time to digest the feedback, let the person know you would like to sleep on their comments before responding.

    Giving feedback can be accomplished in three simple statements:

    1. Deliver the data – not your opinions.
    2. Let the person know how this made you feel.
    3. State your wish for how you would like to see things changed for the future. If this is a manager giving performance feedback, this is the time to also deliver a fitting consequence if the situation is not resolved.

    Here is an example:

    1. Mary, last week in our team meeting I requested you submit your TPS report by this Monday. It is Wednesday and I still haven’t seen your report.
    2. I am frustrated that I wasn’t heard asking for the report or informed about a delay in the process of delivering it to me.
    3. My wish for the future is that you meet deadlines that are asked of you or you communicate in advance why you can’t meet the deadline. I would like this report submitted by noon tomorrow. If I do not receive your reports on time, I will not approve your future requests to leave a few minutes early.

    You can finish by thanking the person for accepting your feedback and be willing for it to work the other way around (minus the consequences part).

    Bee School may be over, but we have another webinar around the corner! Sign up for the next one with employee engagement expert, Jill Christensen, who will share her four-step strategy to immediately engage employees.



Bee School Session 5: “Emotional Intelligence” Q&A

Bee School Session 5: “Emotional Intelligence” Q&A

Everyone knows what an IQ is, but not many know what an EQ (emotional quotient) is and why it’s critical for successful leadership. This week’s Bee School lecture focused on “Emotional Intelligence” which determines your EQ. This concept is defined as the ability to recognize and regulate your emotions and those of others around you. Emotional intelligence (EI) includes the following:
emotional intelligence chart

Although the term is relatively new, the concept has been around for a long time. MBA professor and host of the Bee School educational series has conducted a significant amount of research on the topic. She found most managers have roughly the same amount of technical skills, and what sets good managers apart from exceptional ones is a high EQ.

Results consistently showed this was the main differentiator and, by having these skills, managers could be miles ahead of the average manager. By honing these skills, you can relate to people of different backgrounds and bring out the best out in yourself and colleagues by being aware of behaviors and how they impact others.

Dr. Herkenhoff shared some of her own examples of how she used emotional intelligence to solve complex challenges at global organizations. Her findings showed there is a positive relationship between emotional intelligence and job satisfaction. It’s directly responsible for increased retention, productivity, confidence, innovation, and lower stress levels. Alternatively, a low EQ can result in a lack of commitment, loyalty, organizational values, safety, and poor customer service.

During the seminar, there were two questions for the professor and you’ll see her responses below. If you have any further questions about the class content or Bee School in general, email us at beeschool@beekeeper.io.

Q&A with the Professor

1. What do I do when I discover emotional destructive behavior from an employee? How do I address this issue in a dialogue?

This is a tricky question to answer without any background or context, but I’ll do my best. If the issues being brought into the workplace are personal in nature or have escalated to the point of potential physical threats, I would advise consulting your HR department or someone else within the organization to discuss a plan of action that would result in the best outcome for all parties.

I would also advise against getting into a deeply personal conversation with the person. You are a manager, not a therapist. Your goal is to help your employee find the resources they need to be happy and whole so they can successfully perform their job.

If the destructive behavior impacts others within the organization, it must be addressed before it becomes a spiral of negative or toxic energy within the organization. Focus on the merits of the issues and seek a win-win solution first.

If it’s not as serious in nature, take a step back and try to recognize where your colleague is coming from and understand their pain. You can look at the factors in Hofstede’s model to help fine-tune your response and determine the way that particular person would like to communicate.

Address these during in-person meetings as they have the richest context. Before the first meeting, I would document the performance issues you’ve noticed that are related to the destructive behavior and review each within the context of job performance. List dates and times of specific job issues followed by your wish for how these issues would be handled in the future.

Once you have the meetings, make it clear you understand their side and also articulate how negative emotions affect company operations as a whole. Maybe they didn’t realize the impact they’re having and how much you genuinely care about their happiness at work. Ask the employee if there is anything he or she needs to accomplish your wishes.

Be careful that you are not asking what you as a manager can do to get them there. It is up to the individual to make the decision to change and it is up to you to provide the resources, if possible, to help accomplish your wishes as well as theirs. It is not up to you to fix or take on the emotional burden of an employee. It is your job to identify the problem within the context of the workplace and work on a collaborative solution where you are supporting the employee, but not fixing the issue for them.

Once the issue has been discussed and the employee has expressed what they need to adjust their behavior, make a plan to revisit the conversation weekly to check in on progress.

Your goal should be to avoid:

  • Lost productivity
  • Theft
  • Sabotage
  • Lack of commitment
  • Lack of loyalty
  • Low personal safety
  • Perception bias- pessimistic outlook
  • Poor customer service
  • Toxic work environment

2. Does EQ take precedence over normal intelligence?

Depending on the job duties, a healthy mix of both should be there. When it comes to normal intelligence, employees should be able to adequately perform all of their job functions and have the ability to extend their scope to adjacent functions with ease. If the person can accomplish their role, the level of EQ can make the difference between a C player and an A player.

A players are a must on every team. Their self-awareness, empathy, adaptability, and self-confidence can be motivating and contagious for your B players striving to be A players. To excel as a leader, both are important. From my research, I’ve found managers are generally the same technically, but it’s the emotional intelligence that sets them apart and makes them the best leader.

First time hearing about Bee School? It’s not too late to sign up for the last class! Reserve your spot below for this free educational series and we can email you the sessions you missed.
bee school sessions 3&4 QA

Bee School Sessions 3&4: “Professional Culture” and “Organizational Culture” Q&A

We had to skip a Q&A post for Thanksgiving, but we are back on track! The last two Tuesdays we hosted the third and fourth sessions of our educational series, Bee School. Thank you to those of you who joined or plan on joining us for the final two classes.

The topics for the last two lectures were “Professional Culture” and “Organizational Culture” where Dr. Linda Herkenhoff discussed the differences between the two, how to measure them, and ways to ensure your organization is strong in both. She delved into how these cultural values increase commitment and provide a sense of identity for employees, allowing for a more productive workplace.

You had some great questions and we appreciate you taking the time to send them to us. Below are the questions from other managers and you can read Dr. Herkenhoff’s responses. If you have any further questions about the class content or Bee School in general, email us at beeschool@beekeeper.io.

Q&A with the Professor

1. What are the main differences between professional and organizational culture? Should the emphasis be placed more on one than the other?

Organizational culture is a pattern of basic assumptions that are considered valid and are taught to new members as the way to perceive, think, and feel in an organization. Organizational cultures are learned over short periods of time since people have to adapt to the new organization they’re entering quickly.

Alternatively, professional cultures are learned over long periods and are more inherent. In fact, most professional culture is learned even before employees start a new job. Since organizational culture is more difficult to learn, the focus for a manager should primarily be placed in this arena. That’s how you’ll get new hires to become familiar with the team and corporate culture so they feel comfortable and aligned. Those qualities poise them to be a more successful contributing member.

2. What are some immediate steps I can take to start enhancing our organizational culture?

Through role modeling, teaching, and coaching, leaders can reinforce the values that support organizational culture. Here are six guidelines to help establish corporate culture:

  1. Create a clear and simple mission statement.
  2. Create systems that ensure an effective flow of information.
  3. Create “matrix minds” among managers. In other words, broaden their minds to allow them to think globally.
  4. Develop career paths that allow employees to rotate between offices.
  5. Use cultural differences as a major asset.
  6. Implement management education and team development programs.

Since every company is different, you’ll need to tailor each one of these to fit your business needs. Start by assessing your current status in these areas and finding where there’s room for improvement.

3. How should culture be a part of the onboarding process?

Newcomers learn culture through organizational socialization. This is the process by which newcomers are transformed from outsiders to participating, effective members of the organization. There are three stages of socialization:

1) Anticipatory socialization
This first stage encompasses all of the learnings that take place on the first day on the job. On the first day, storytelling is a great way to set the right tone.

Here are a few ideas of different stories to weave into the content of your first day:

  • Tell new employees something about how their bosses are human and espoused one of your corporate values during a stressful time.
  • Everyone is worried about not making the grade on the first day.
  • Recounting a story about the company’s hiring and firing history will be better coming from you and put your newcomer’s concerns to rest about job security.
  • If applicable, you can tell stories about how the company deals with relocation or other major life changes that happen in an employee’s personal life.
  • Stories about how lower level employees rise to the top are always motivating.
  • Explaining how leadership dealt with a crisis situation will often speak volumes about that company’s culture. It starts at the top!
  • Stories about how status considerations work when rules are broken. For example, when one of the former CEO’s of IBM wasn’t wearing his badge, a dutiful security guard confronted him and required the correct credentials before allowing him to pass!

2) Encounter
The second stage of socialization is when newcomers learn the tasks associated with the job, clarity in their roles, and establish new relationships at work. In this stage, be sure to set firm expectations to avoid ambiguity for the newcomer and, possibly more importantly, existing employees.

3) Change and Acquisition
Here, newcomers that are successfully socialized begin to master their domain and should be exhibiting good performance, high job satisfaction, and intend to stay with the organization.

Don’t miss Tuesday’s lecture, “Emotional Intelligence,” where you’ll find out how to look beyond basic emotional intelligence and fine-tune your approach by taking all three types of culture into account.

First time hearing about Bee School? It’s not too late to sign up! Reserve your spot below for this free educational series and we can email you the sessions you missed.
bee school Q&A

Bee School Session 2: “National Culture” Q&A

On Tuesday we hosted the second session of our new educational series, Bee School. Thank you to those of you who joined or plan on joining us in the upcoming weeks!

The topic of this week’s lecture was “National Culture” where Dr. Linda Herkenhoff discussed why understanding national culture is so important and how ignoring it can negatively impact your bottom line. As a manager, recognizing cultural differences can help you redesign motivation systems for a more satisfying and productive work environment. She also described the power of taking the qualitative concept of culture and building it out as a more quantitative variable. Something tangible that can be measured and used in the workplace.

Some of you had some questions for Dr. Herkenhoff and you can read her responses below. Your questions are not only helpful for us so we can get to know your needs and challenges better, they also enrich the learning process for everyone in the program. So keep them coming!

Hopefully these answers help you apply these theories to your own team.

Q&A with the Professor

1. How can you apply this knowledge to the differences in national cultures when communicating about benefits?

No matter where your company is located, paying your employees fair wages and benefit packages is always in style. I would recommend speaking with similar companies to yours to get a better understanding of salary ranges and benefits offered in your city or region as a benchmark to work form. Then you can consider cultural values to determine if your employees place a higher value on things like time off versus larger bonuses or higher pay.

 

In a global organization, creating a pay and benefit structure that motivates all nationalities can be difficult. Since I’ve been working with Beekeeper, let’s use them as an example. Their employee base includes people from 22 countries and one of their core values is Bee Open which allows employees to give and receive feedback in a constructive manner.  When there are major changes that happen within the company,  employees care enough to give honest and direct feedback on the initiatives rolled out. This feedback is discussed within the executive meeting and action is quickly taken.

There are so many types of benefits to consider that extend beyond the standard ones we think of. For example, some cultures have dietary restrictions so benefits can even be in the form of providing free snacks that are aligned with their values. Many cultures place a high value on continuing education so you can provide internal workshops where everyone is invited to share knowledge and aid in professional development. Assess the varying national cultures and find out what benefits are important and survey your team to craft and communicate the best benefits plan.

Stay tuned for next Tuesday’s lecture, “Professional Culture,” to learn the importance of a professional culture and what steps you can take to ensure yours is sustainable.

First time hearing about Bee School? It’s not too late to sign up! Reserve your spot below for this free educational series and we can email you the sessions you missed.
The Honor Foundation

How The Honor Foundation Lowered My Golf Score and Assisted this SOF Veteran

The Honor Foundation (THF) is a unique transition institute created exclusively for Navy SEALs and the U.S. Special Operations community. They’re dedicated to preparing these outstanding men and women to continue to realize their maximum potential during and after their service career. As part of their efforts to ease the transition into civilian positions in the workforce, they do a tour of small, midsize, and large companies to expose members to different career opportunities.

THF Meets the Beekeeper Team

This year we invited 35 of these Special Operations Forces (SOF) personnel to take a tour of Beekeeper. At first we were excited to teach them about our product, company, how we operate, and open positions, but we quickly realized that we were the ones that had so much to learn from this esteemed group.

They’re not only highly skilled in combat, they are also brilliantly business savvy and know how to run successful teams like clockwork. From engineers, to data scientists, to marketing professionals, to entrepreneurs—their backgrounds cover it all. During our presentation, each member asked insightful questions and gave valuable feedback. Needless to say, we were incredibly impressed by everyone and humbled by the experience. Not to mention they are just a fun group to get to know on a personal level!

Beekeeper and the honor foundation

In honor of Veteran’s Day, we want to share a story directly from Dan Hathorn, one of the incredible people we met that day. He shares his honest journey about finding his way into civilian life after exiting the military. We’re so grateful he shared his story with us and is willing to share with all of you, as it’s a unique perspective most of us don’t get to see.

Transitioning Into Civilian Life

I’ll never forget that time. I was lying in a hospital bed pondering my next life choices when I came face to face with an unexpected transition. I was injured while on deployment overseas, and the extent of my injuries left me wondering if I would be re-writing most of my activities of daily living, let alone staying in the military until the desired retirement date of 20 years.

I clawed, scraped, and fought my way back to active duty, sticking around for another four years before I was medically retired. After my departure from the military, I wasn’t unhappy with myself. I was unsure, unprepared, and woefully ignorant of exactly how much I didn’t know about life outside of Special Operations.

Dan Hathorn

I landed a comfortable job with a local area sports store, managing a small business before leaving abruptly due to feelings of low self-worth and lack of purpose. I didn’t stick around lamenting for too long before I landed a job within a four-star veterans non-profit dedicated to assisting wounded, ill, or injured service members reintegrate back into society—with structured programs taking all branches of service members from the hospital bed, to living on their own, or with their families.

It wasn’t long before I left that organization as well, still feeling a substantial lack of purpose in my life, and overall comfort that people wanted me for what I brought to the table, not some “quick fix” veterans hire to boost a statistic on a bottom line somewhere. I was adrift in a sea of melancholy. I didn’t feel at home. I knew I had skills that were in demand, but lacked the ability to articulate those skills clearly, cleanly, and in a manner that resonated with my personality.

A quick Internet search will reveal a plethora of military transition services all catering to the service member’s desire to reintegrate into society. I reached out to some of these services and found a lot of the same things, resume writers, tutorials and quick classes, and people interested in “teaching” many of us veterans’ necessary skills needed to find the success that we may or may not have known within the military. I used a couple of these organizations with almost zero results. I paid $700 for a resume that, when complete, was touted as a 98% success at landing me a job. I used it a handful of times with no success.

One day while browsing around on LinkedIn for various opportunities and connections I noticed a friend had loaded a new picture of himself into his profile. I clicked over and started to read his very professional and well-written profile. Imagine my surprise, after asking him; when I found out he’d done it himself!

He told me about The Honor Foundation www.honor.org (THF), their fellowship program, and their desire to take Special Operations Forces (SOF) through an MBA-level training curriculum designed by some of the best minds and professionals in the education industry. How were they different? What separates them from the crowd, besides clientele? At the end of the day the results should speak for themselves, right? I submitted an application and was granted a face-to-face interview to gauge my level of commitment and accountability to the terms of the fellowship. I was captivated with what I found on the inside.

SOF personnel, like golf, spend a lot of time learning to crawl first, then walk, and then run. All of the high-speed stuff you read about in the news didn’t happen instantly. These individuals, like myself, were groomed over weeks and months of training. Repetition in one area meant success in another.

Dan Hathorn

Post retirement, I found myself feeling like a Formula 1 race car driver on a track filled with wind-up toys. I had a skilled, honed mind, ready to tackle diverse problems, in any environment and succeed no matter what. I was floundering around trying not to run into everyone while leaving a path of destruction in my wake for lack of societal, and cultural understanding. The Honor Foundation took that ability to learn in any environment, at any pace, and challenged us fellows with the task of going back through training again.

Having spent the better portion of our lives learning the slow backswing of SOF practices, we were now the pros at the long accurate drives that generated huge success for our countries various initiatives. While those skills can certainly translate into the private sector, we needed to hit the range again and start taking lessons. This forum was an entirely new game.

From having classes on challenging communications, learning how to present in 30 seconds or less, writing drills, business simulations, and a hefty reading list, this Fellowship was certainly not for the weak of heart. For the transitioning SOF individual, this course represents the spirit of Special Operations personnel. We all know how to train for the win, but we’ve all also been granted the autonomy to create that success on our own, within the overarching structure of Special Operations.

What happens when you leave the military? Your transition is now handed over to someone who “knows” resumes and you rely on them to tell your story. This is akin to buying a golf lesson and then watching the instructor hit accurate drives wearing a mask with your likeness. It’s not authentic. It’s not you. The name of the game for The Honor Foundation, in my opinion, is authenticity, and credibility. The game of golf can be a quick game when the foundation for success is there. Without this foundation you find yourself striking inaccurately and inefficiently and without purpose.

As I approach the graduation of The Honor Foundation Group 10 cohort in Virginia Beach, I sit back and reflect on where I was, and where I am now. I arrived as a man, devoid of purpose, unsure of himself, and not entirely certain where I fit into this new life I was staring down. I now stride confidently and with a clear purpose on my direction.

They say, “A rising tide lifts all boats” right? If SOF individuals are in such high demand, then all industry executives should be standing by patiently waiting for each cohort to graduate. This SOF finishing school provides a C-suite level workforce that only deepens the value of all veterans, SOF and conventional forces alike.

To learn more about The Honor Foundation or thank these veterans for their service, contact them at www.honor.org/contact.
Bee School Session 1: “Motivation at Work” Q&A

Bee School Session 1: “Motivation at Work” Q&A

On Tuesday we held the first session of our new educational series, Bee School. And, because of you, it was a success! We had a great turnout, so thank you to all of those who joined and we hope to see you in the next five sessions.

The topic of this week’s discussion was “Motivation at Work” where Dr. Linda Herkenhoff discussed the true definition of motivation, the three groups of theories associated with it, details and examples, and how to apply these theories globally.

Some of you had some questions for Dr. Herkenhoff and you know we would never leave you hanging! Many of you had similar questions which was encouraging to see lots of managers face the same challenges, but are eager to find innovative ways to motivate their teams. Hopefully these answers will help guide you on your quest for engagement and alignment.

Q&A with the Professor

1. As I’m from the Information Technology domain, it would be interesting to know how different domains are using motivation frameworks to keep their knowledge workers engaged and excited.

People are people—these frameworks can be used for knowledge and non-desk workers alike. The core principles of engagement and motivation are great communication on all levels. Following Theory Y, we can assume that knowledge workers fall into a different level of Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs. Where a non-desk worker might have their Safety and Security needs met before reaching a level of engagement, a knowledge worker will need help reaching self-actualization.

A good question to ask your team is what their vision for themselves is in the next five years. Whether or not that vision has a path within your company, help give them the tools they need to grow within their existing position and beyond.

Any good manager will tell you that it is a proud moment when the people working for them grow out of their positions and progress within their careers. You can create a tremendous amount of goodwill within your team if you are helping them achieve their life goals or self-actualization. For the organization, it is always best to have your employees operating at the highest level of Maslow’s pyramid.

If we consider your question from the Hygiene Theory perspective, the principles are universal. You need to make sure your hygiene factors are always in check. This is always a good baseline to work from. As a refresher, here they are:

Hygiene Factors

1. Company policy & administration
2. Supervision
3. Interpersonal relations
4. Working conditions
5. Salary
6. Status
7. Security

Once you have a good foundation in place, you can focus on the motivation factors. We usually see that after the first year of employment, growth and advancement become more important to pay attention to. (In the first year, there is much to be done while mastering a position.)

While advancement and growth aren’t options, make sure you are recognizing individual contributions and team wins. Communicating these to the team, in addition to your 1:1 praise, will go a long way to show appreciation. It will also shape your team’s expectation of rewarded behavior and make them strive for their own recognition. As a refresher, here are the motivation factors:

Motivation Factors

1. Achievement recognition
2. Work itself
3. Responsibility
4. Advancement
5. Growth
6. Salary

2. I’m going to take over a team that currently finds itself in a reorganization process. It would be great to learn some skills, how to approach them as their new boss, and how to keep their motivation high.

Uncertainty breeds fear. If we take a look at Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs, engagement can only happen after the first few levels are satisfied.

To get your team to a place of engagement and motivation, I would recommend approaching your team with open communication and transparency. Schedule a series of 1:1 meetings with each of your new reports to get to know them. Listen to their concerns and get to know the lay of the land. Then show them you’ve listened through your actions. Lay out your vision in a clear and transparent way that is shared with everyone in 1:1 meetings and again in a team session.

Stay tuned for next Tuesday’s lecture, “National Culture,” where you’ll gain the knowledge and tools for working with varied cultures around the world.

First time hearing about Bee School? It’s not too late to sign up! Reserve your spot below for this free educational series and we can email you the sessions you missed.
bee school is in session

Bee School is in Session!

Today marks the launch our first educational series, Bee School, designed to help managers lead their teams and operate successful companies. This initiative is our spin on business school, taught by renowned MBA professor and senior management expert, Dr. Linda Herkenhoff.

Although classes start today, it’s not too late to enroll for free. If you missed today’s session you can still sign up and we will email you the recording. This is your chance to receive a postgraduate education without the cost!

Our mission to pave the future of work for non-desk workers and those who manage them is at the core of why we started Bee School. Over the span of six weeks, course participants will gain valuable insights on how to keep employees motivated and engaged at work, as well as how to build and navigate inclusive work cultures.

See the full details, including the schedule and curriculum.

Are you ready to take the next step in becoming a proactive, organized, and motivational leader? Reserve your spot below for this free educational series.
Android-Oberfläche

Beekeeper Announces New Android Interface

The Beekeeper app for Android devices is getting a fresh new look and even simpler interface. The new user interface aligns more with the iPhone navigation, providing a better user experience and making it easier to help colleagues using a different device.

What is changing?

The main app navigation containing streams, chats, and notifications tabs moved to the bottom of the page. The tabs are marked not only with an icon, but also with a name so users can better understand which icons do what.

The stream will show you public posts for all colleagues. In the chats, you will find private conversations with one colleague, group chats, campaign announcements, and surveys. The notification will display all alerts you haven’t read yet.

New Beekeeper Android Interface

Additionally, the “More” tab (previously the app menu) moved from the top left to the bottom right of the screen. The icon changed from three horizontal lines to a square. This is where you can find information about the app and the customized navigation extensions that your organization might have set up for you.

In the top left corner you can find the stream switcher. Many organizations use multiple streams and here is where you can switch from one to the other.

Lastly, the stream information has remained in the top right corner, but you’ll need to tap the circled “i”, to view the stream details, suggested tags, and view who has access to that stream.

Why are we doing this?

We build our app using native Android and iPhone layouts to facilitate seamless navigation for our users. iPhone traditionally provides navigation at the bottom, while Android had it at the top of the screen. Google, who designs Android software, recently released a new navigation layout at the bottom of the screen that is more similar to the iPhone interface.

We monitored the way customers use the app and found the iPhone navigation was more intuitive. Our iPhone users were switching streams more frequently than Android users and also switch more frequently between chats and the app menu.

By aligning both versions of the app and changing to the iPhone navigation, we’re aiming to provide you with a better user experience.

To find helpful app information and FAQs, visit the Beekeeper Help Center.