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Beekeeper Launches Read Receipts in Chat Messages

Beekeeper Launches Read Receipts in Chat Messages

You’ll start noticing an improvement in chat messages in the Beekeeper app. Since one-on-one and group chats are a heavily used feature, we wanted to improve the chat experience for our customers. This is one we’ve been excited to launch for a long time!

When you send chat messages, do you ever wonder if they are being read? Now you don’t have to. It doesn’t matter if it’s a 1:1 message or a group chat, read receipts in chats tell you which colleagues have read your message and which ones still haven’t. For group chats, click on a message to access a “Message Info” box, to see more information.

This feature is critical for ensuring important or time-sensitive information is read, and, if not, you can follow up with the appropriate contact. It also creates an extra level of accountability as colleagues will be more likely to respond if they know coworkers can see if the message has been read.

Read Receipt Markers

To familiarize you with the new UI, here’s a picture of the possible states and how they’ll appear:

Sending – Message is sending

status: sending message

Sent – Message was received by server, but not yet read

status: message sent

Partially Read – Some, but not all users have read the message

status: partially sent

Read – Message was read by all chat participants

status: message read

Below is the “Message Info” box we mentioned to find out who read your messages.

Beekeeper Message Info Box

Additional Capabilities Coming Soon

There are many other exciting features in the pipeline to continue our journey enhancing the chat experience. Soon you will see a notification at the bottom of the screen when colleagues are typing so you are aware of an incoming message and don’t type over each other.

Additionally, we’re developing a way to help you sort through your unread messages with the “Chat Marker” feature. Every time you enter a chat that has unread messages, it will automatically direct you to the last message you read, giving you the opportunity to catch up on what you missed.

Hopefully this is a useful feature for your day-to-day communication and operations. And if not, you can deactivate it at any time. To deactivate the feature, go to to your Dashboard Settings or contact your Customer Success Manager for assistance.

For more information about Beekeeper and specific features, check out our Help Center or contact us. Let us know how you’re using the platform and what other improvements or features you’d like to see.



Bee School Leadership and Followership QA

Bee School Session 6: “Leadership and Followership” Q&A

Class is dismissed! Sadly, Bee School has ended with Dr. Herkenhoff’s lecture on “Leadership and Followership,” but we have a few more insights to share. This educational series has been a great success and we couldn’t have done it without your participation!

Leadership

In the final session titled “Leadership and Followership,” Dr. Herkenhoff explains the qualities of each, why they are essential, and how to improve in both areas. First, she dives into leadership—the act of guiding and directing others. She explains the differences between formal and informal leadership, and identifies the four types of leaders with examples, pros, and cons of each.

Leadership Styles

leadership styles

Expanding on her last lecture on “Emotional Intelligence,” she reveals her research findings that good leaders have the technical know-how and high IQ, but great leaders have those and a high EQ. That is the ultimate differentiator, along with knowing how to build communities.

Below are what she deems as the most important leadership skills:

  • Tolerance for ambiguity
  • Frazzle factor (stress)
  • Risk-taking
  • Feedback
  • Remember: People join companies, but leave managers. Be a great manager and you will retain your people.

    Followership

    On the flip side of leadership, followership is the process of being guided and directed. Many people consider the term “follower” as negative, but that it simply not the case. Effective followers have the power to improve organizations and influence their leaders. We are all followers at some point, so these skills are essential for each and every one of us.

    The professor outlines the four types of followers and pros and cons of each to prove her case.

    Type of Followers
    Types of Followers

    There were two great questions asked during the presentation and below are Dr. Herkenhoff’s responses. If you have any further questions or feedback about Bee School, or want us to send you the recording, email us at beeschool@beekeeper.io.

    Q&A with the Professor

    1. Do good leaders need to be good followers?

    Absolutely. Being a good follower doesn’t make you a sheep. There are many traits learned as a follower that make better leaders.

    Collaboration is the key to success. Leaders who have learned how to work with people and bring out the best in them will create a strong culture and have an easier time motivating teams to accomplish goals. Similar to collaboration, diplomacy means knowing how to get along with those who have differences while not ignoring those differences. Leaders can’t afford to be oblivious to the attitudes surrounding them.

    It is this awareness that is learned while being a follower that allows leaders to take into account their various audiences including colleagues, board members, customers, and coworkers. A good leader knows each of their stakeholder groups well enough to know what it will take to bring them along for the ride.

    Collaboration, diplomacy, and awareness are great, but critical thinking and knowing when to stand up to their leaders is an admirable trait learned as a follower. It is this motivation, intelligence, and competence that inspires followership.

    Standing up to your leaders at every point in your career when you think things are heading in the wrong direction takes courage. This requires critical thinking and awareness of the situation to get your point across with the conviction and energy needed to change what is wrong, as well as support a leader or manager who is doing things well.

    2. What is the best process for delivering and receiving feedback?

    Delivering feedback is one of the most difficult things for people to do, so when you receive feedback, the first thing you should say is “thank you.” The courage that it takes to give any feedback is significant. The fact someone took the time and effort to make you better deserves to be treated with appreciation.

    After receiving feedback and thanking the person, take a minute to reflect and do your best to remove your personal emotions from any response. If you need more time to digest the feedback, let the person know you would like to sleep on their comments before responding.

    Giving feedback can be accomplished in three simple statements:

    1. Deliver the data – not your opinions.
    2. Let the person know how this made you feel.
    3. State your wish for how you would like to see things changed for the future. If this is a manager giving performance feedback, this is the time to also deliver a fitting consequence if the situation is not resolved.

    Here is an example:

    1. Mary, last week in our team meeting I requested you submit your TPS report by this Monday. It is Wednesday and I still haven’t seen your report.
    2. I am frustrated that I wasn’t heard asking for the report or informed about a delay in the process of delivering it to me.
    3. My wish for the future is that you meet deadlines that are asked of you or you communicate in advance why you can’t meet the deadline. I would like this report submitted by noon tomorrow. If I do not receive your reports on time, I will not approve your future requests to leave a few minutes early.

    You can finish by thanking the person for accepting your feedback and be willing for it to work the other way around (minus the consequences part).

    Bee School may be over, but we have another webinar around the corner! Sign up for the next one with employee engagement expert, Jill Christensen, who will share her four-step strategy to immediately engage employees.



Best Practices for Employee Satisfaction Surveys

Why 73 Questions Only Works for Vogue: Best Practices for Employee Satisfaction Surveys

You may have seen Vogue’s famous “73 Questions Answered by Your Favorite Celebs” video series, which got us thinking about how 73 questions could apply to something we are experts in—employee satisfaction surveys!

Voque asks their favorite personalities 73 questions to see what they like, dislike, and share their knowledge, and employee satisfaction surveys accomplish a similar goal. (Although, we think 73 questions is too many for a survey—but more on that later.) Employee surveys are designed to gauge likes, dislikes, and satisfaction levels across the organization and ensure everyone is aligned as much as possible.

In November, Sarah Deane, Experience Design expert and Founder of EffectUX, sat down with Beekeeper CEO, Cris Grossmann, for a Q&A session about how to develop the most effective employee satisfaction surveys. The article was published in the Huffington Post to share best practices with readers so every organization can have the right tools to gather meaningful feedback to make organizational improvements.

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With employee disengagement numbers being shown at near 70%, more and more organizations are looking at how they can create better workplace cultures to engage their workforce in meaningful ways, and for good reason. Workforces with higher levels of engagement have been found to be more profitable, have less turnover, and have increased customer loyalty. The business case for engagement is clear – it has been found that disengaged employees cost the American economy up to $350 billion per year due to lost productivity.

To test Beekeeper’s mobile platform and try the employee satisfaction survey feature, fill out the form below for a free trial.


Bee School Session 5: “Emotional Intelligence” Q&A

Bee School Session 5: “Emotional Intelligence” Q&A

Everyone knows what an IQ is, but not many know what an EQ (emotional quotient) is and why it’s critical for successful leadership. This week’s Bee School lecture focused on “Emotional Intelligence” which determines your EQ. This concept is defined as the ability to recognize and regulate your emotions and those of others around you. Emotional intelligence (EI) includes the following:
emotional intelligence chart

Although the term is relatively new, the concept has been around for a long time. MBA professor and host of the Bee School educational series has conducted a significant amount of research on the topic. She found most managers have roughly the same amount of technical skills, and what sets good managers apart from exceptional ones is a high EQ.

Results consistently showed this was the main differentiator and, by having these skills, managers could be miles ahead of the average manager. By honing these skills, you can relate to people of different backgrounds and bring out the best out in yourself and colleagues by being aware of behaviors and how they impact others.

Dr. Herkenhoff shared some of her own examples of how she used emotional intelligence to solve complex challenges at global organizations. Her findings showed there is a positive relationship between emotional intelligence and job satisfaction. It’s directly responsible for increased retention, productivity, confidence, innovation, and lower stress levels. Alternatively, a low EQ can result in a lack of commitment, loyalty, organizational values, safety, and poor customer service.

During the seminar, there were two questions for the professor and you’ll see her responses below. If you have any further questions about the class content or Bee School in general, email us at beeschool@beekeeper.io.

Q&A with the Professor

1. What do I do when I discover emotional destructive behavior from an employee? How do I address this issue in a dialogue?

This is a tricky question to answer without any background or context, but I’ll do my best. If the issues being brought into the workplace are personal in nature or have escalated to the point of potential physical threats, I would advise consulting your HR department or someone else within the organization to discuss a plan of action that would result in the best outcome for all parties.

I would also advise against getting into a deeply personal conversation with the person. You are a manager, not a therapist. Your goal is to help your employee find the resources they need to be happy and whole so they can successfully perform their job.

If the destructive behavior impacts others within the organization, it must be addressed before it becomes a spiral of negative or toxic energy within the organization. Focus on the merits of the issues and seek a win-win solution first.

If it’s not as serious in nature, take a step back and try to recognize where your colleague is coming from and understand their pain. You can look at the factors in Hofstede’s model to help fine-tune your response and determine the way that particular person would like to communicate.

Address these during in-person meetings as they have the richest context. Before the first meeting, I would document the performance issues you’ve noticed that are related to the destructive behavior and review each within the context of job performance. List dates and times of specific job issues followed by your wish for how these issues would be handled in the future.

Once you have the meetings, make it clear you understand their side and also articulate how negative emotions affect company operations as a whole. Maybe they didn’t realize the impact they’re having and how much you genuinely care about their happiness at work. Ask the employee if there is anything he or she needs to accomplish your wishes.

Be careful that you are not asking what you as a manager can do to get them there. It is up to the individual to make the decision to change and it is up to you to provide the resources, if possible, to help accomplish your wishes as well as theirs. It is not up to you to fix or take on the emotional burden of an employee. It is your job to identify the problem within the context of the workplace and work on a collaborative solution where you are supporting the employee, but not fixing the issue for them.

Once the issue has been discussed and the employee has expressed what they need to adjust their behavior, make a plan to revisit the conversation weekly to check in on progress.

Your goal should be to avoid:

  • Lost productivity
  • Theft
  • Sabotage
  • Lack of commitment
  • Lack of loyalty
  • Low personal safety
  • Perception bias- pessimistic outlook
  • Poor customer service
  • Toxic work environment

2. Does EQ take precedence over normal intelligence?

Depending on the job duties, a healthy mix of both should be there. When it comes to normal intelligence, employees should be able to adequately perform all of their job functions and have the ability to extend their scope to adjacent functions with ease. If the person can accomplish their role, the level of EQ can make the difference between a C player and an A player.

A players are a must on every team. Their self-awareness, empathy, adaptability, and self-confidence can be motivating and contagious for your B players striving to be A players. To excel as a leader, both are important. From my research, I’ve found managers are generally the same technically, but it’s the emotional intelligence that sets them apart and makes them the best leader.

First time hearing about Bee School? It’s not too late to sign up for the last class! Reserve your spot below for this free educational series and we can email you the sessions you missed.
new eu gdpr significantly impacts any hotel with international guests

New EU GDPR Significantly Impacts Any Hotel With International Guests

You’ve probably been hearing a lot of buzz about the EU GDPR. In case you want a refresher, the EU General Data Protection Regulation was designed to harmonize data privacy laws across Europe to protect citizens’ personal data and stand on a united front regarding every organization’s approach to security. It was approved on April 14, 2016 and companies are scrambling to comply since the regulation will be enforced May 25, 2018. Any companies that aren’t compliant will face heavy fines up to 4% of annual global turnover or $20 million Euros, whichever is greater.

If you work for a company outside the EU, you may think this doesn’t affect your data security standards—but think again. The GDPR doesn’t only affect companies in the EU. Any vendors and suppliers that work with countries in the EU must comply with the GDPR as well. This significantly impacts hotels as the majority have international customers, many of whom reside in the EU.

Beekeeper was recently featured on Asian Hospitality discussing the implications of the EU GDPR on hotels. Check out the full article to learn more about how this regulation affects your hospitality business.

Now is the time to assess your GDPR compliance and see what extra steps your organization needs to take to meet the deadline. Enter the form below to download Beekeeper’s 31-Point Assessment.


bee school sessions 3&4 QA

Bee School Sessions 3&4: “Professional Culture” and “Organizational Culture” Q&A

We had to skip a Q&A post for Thanksgiving, but we are back on track! The last two Tuesdays we hosted the third and fourth sessions of our educational series, Bee School. Thank you to those of you who joined or plan on joining us for the final two classes.

The topics for the last two lectures were “Professional Culture” and “Organizational Culture” where Dr. Linda Herkenhoff discussed the differences between the two, how to measure them, and ways to ensure your organization is strong in both. She delved into how these cultural values increase commitment and provide a sense of identity for employees, allowing for a more productive workplace.

You had some great questions and we appreciate you taking the time to send them to us. Below are the questions from other managers and you can read Dr. Herkenhoff’s responses. If you have any further questions about the class content or Bee School in general, email us at beeschool@beekeeper.io.

Q&A with the Professor

1. What are the main differences between professional and organizational culture? Should the emphasis be placed more on one than the other?

Organizational culture is a pattern of basic assumptions that are considered valid and are taught to new members as the way to perceive, think, and feel in an organization. Organizational cultures are learned over short periods of time since people have to adapt to the new organization they’re entering quickly.

Alternatively, professional cultures are learned over long periods and are more inherent. In fact, most professional culture is learned even before employees start a new job. Since organizational culture is more difficult to learn, the focus for a manager should primarily be placed in this arena. That’s how you’ll get new hires to become familiar with the team and corporate culture so they feel comfortable and aligned. Those qualities poise them to be a more successful contributing member.

2. What are some immediate steps I can take to start enhancing our organizational culture?

Through role modeling, teaching, and coaching, leaders can reinforce the values that support organizational culture. Here are six guidelines to help establish corporate culture:

  1. Create a clear and simple mission statement.
  2. Create systems that ensure an effective flow of information.
  3. Create “matrix minds” among managers. In other words, broaden their minds to allow them to think globally.
  4. Develop career paths that allow employees to rotate between offices.
  5. Use cultural differences as a major asset.
  6. Implement management education and team development programs.

Since every company is different, you’ll need to tailor each one of these to fit your business needs. Start by assessing your current status in these areas and finding where there’s room for improvement.

3. How should culture be a part of the onboarding process?

Newcomers learn culture through organizational socialization. This is the process by which newcomers are transformed from outsiders to participating, effective members of the organization. There are three stages of socialization:

1) Anticipatory socialization
This first stage encompasses all of the learnings that take place on the first day on the job. On the first day, storytelling is a great way to set the right tone.

Here are a few ideas of different stories to weave into the content of your first day:

  • Tell new employees something about how their bosses are human and espoused one of your corporate values during a stressful time.
  • Everyone is worried about not making the grade on the first day.
  • Recounting a story about the company’s hiring and firing history will be better coming from you and put your newcomer’s concerns to rest about job security.
  • If applicable, you can tell stories about how the company deals with relocation or other major life changes that happen in an employee’s personal life.
  • Stories about how lower level employees rise to the top are always motivating.
  • Explaining how leadership dealt with a crisis situation will often speak volumes about that company’s culture. It starts at the top!
  • Stories about how status considerations work when rules are broken. For example, when one of the former CEO’s of IBM wasn’t wearing his badge, a dutiful security guard confronted him and required the correct credentials before allowing him to pass!

2) Encounter
The second stage of socialization is when newcomers learn the tasks associated with the job, clarity in their roles, and establish new relationships at work. In this stage, be sure to set firm expectations to avoid ambiguity for the newcomer and, possibly more importantly, existing employees.

3) Change and Acquisition
Here, newcomers that are successfully socialized begin to master their domain and should be exhibiting good performance, high job satisfaction, and intend to stay with the organization.

Don’t miss Tuesday’s lecture, “Emotional Intelligence,” where you’ll find out how to look beyond basic emotional intelligence and fine-tune your approach by taking all three types of culture into account.

First time hearing about Bee School? It’s not too late to sign up! Reserve your spot below for this free educational series and we can email you the sessions you missed.
bee school Q&A

Bee School Session 2: “National Culture” Q&A

On Tuesday we hosted the second session of our new educational series, Bee School. Thank you to those of you who joined or plan on joining us in the upcoming weeks!

The topic of this week’s lecture was “National Culture” where Dr. Linda Herkenhoff discussed why understanding national culture is so important and how ignoring it can negatively impact your bottom line. As a manager, recognizing cultural differences can help you redesign motivation systems for a more satisfying and productive work environment. She also described the power of taking the qualitative concept of culture and building it out as a more quantitative variable. Something tangible that can be measured and used in the workplace.

Some of you had some questions for Dr. Herkenhoff and you can read her responses below. Your questions are not only helpful for us so we can get to know your needs and challenges better, they also enrich the learning process for everyone in the program. So keep them coming!

Hopefully these answers help you apply these theories to your own team.

Q&A with the Professor

1. How can you apply this knowledge to the differences in national cultures when communicating about benefits?

No matter where your company is located, paying your employees fair wages and benefit packages is always in style. I would recommend speaking with similar companies to yours to get a better understanding of salary ranges and benefits offered in your city or region as a benchmark to work form. Then you can consider cultural values to determine if your employees place a higher value on things like time off versus larger bonuses or higher pay.

 

In a global organization, creating a pay and benefit structure that motivates all nationalities can be difficult. Since I’ve been working with Beekeeper, let’s use them as an example. Their employee base includes people from 22 countries and one of their core values is Bee Open which allows employees to give and receive feedback in a constructive manner.  When there are major changes that happen within the company,  employees care enough to give honest and direct feedback on the initiatives rolled out. This feedback is discussed within the executive meeting and action is quickly taken.

There are so many types of benefits to consider that extend beyond the standard ones we think of. For example, some cultures have dietary restrictions so benefits can even be in the form of providing free snacks that are aligned with their values. Many cultures place a high value on continuing education so you can provide internal workshops where everyone is invited to share knowledge and aid in professional development. Assess the varying national cultures and find out what benefits are important and survey your team to craft and communicate the best benefits plan.

Stay tuned for next Tuesday’s lecture, “Professional Culture,” to learn the importance of a professional culture and what steps you can take to ensure yours is sustainable.

First time hearing about Bee School? It’s not too late to sign up! Reserve your spot below for this free educational series and we can email you the sessions you missed.
Bee School Session 1: “Motivation at Work” Q&A

Bee School Session 1: “Motivation at Work” Q&A

On Tuesday we held the first session of our new educational series, Bee School. And, because of you, it was a success! We had a great turnout, so thank you to all of those who joined and we hope to see you in the next five sessions.

The topic of this week’s discussion was “Motivation at Work” where Dr. Linda Herkenhoff discussed the true definition of motivation, the three groups of theories associated with it, details and examples, and how to apply these theories globally.

Some of you had some questions for Dr. Herkenhoff and you know we would never leave you hanging! Many of you had similar questions which was encouraging to see lots of managers face the same challenges, but are eager to find innovative ways to motivate their teams. Hopefully these answers will help guide you on your quest for engagement and alignment.

Q&A with the Professor

1. As I’m from the Information Technology domain, it would be interesting to know how different domains are using motivation frameworks to keep their knowledge workers engaged and excited.

People are people—these frameworks can be used for knowledge and non-desk workers alike. The core principles of engagement and motivation are great communication on all levels. Following Theory Y, we can assume that knowledge workers fall into a different level of Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs. Where a non-desk worker might have their Safety and Security needs met before reaching a level of engagement, a knowledge worker will need help reaching self-actualization.

A good question to ask your team is what their vision for themselves is in the next five years. Whether or not that vision has a path within your company, help give them the tools they need to grow within their existing position and beyond.

Any good manager will tell you that it is a proud moment when the people working for them grow out of their positions and progress within their careers. You can create a tremendous amount of goodwill within your team if you are helping them achieve their life goals or self-actualization. For the organization, it is always best to have your employees operating at the highest level of Maslow’s pyramid.

If we consider your question from the Hygiene Theory perspective, the principles are universal. You need to make sure your hygiene factors are always in check. This is always a good baseline to work from. As a refresher, here they are:

Hygiene Factors

1. Company policy & administration
2. Supervision
3. Interpersonal relations
4. Working conditions
5. Salary
6. Status
7. Security

Once you have a good foundation in place, you can focus on the motivation factors. We usually see that after the first year of employment, growth and advancement become more important to pay attention to. (In the first year, there is much to be done while mastering a position.)

While advancement and growth aren’t options, make sure you are recognizing individual contributions and team wins. Communicating these to the team, in addition to your 1:1 praise, will go a long way to show appreciation. It will also shape your team’s expectation of rewarded behavior and make them strive for their own recognition. As a refresher, here are the motivation factors:

Motivation Factors

1. Achievement recognition
2. Work itself
3. Responsibility
4. Advancement
5. Growth
6. Salary

2. I’m going to take over a team that currently finds itself in a reorganization process. It would be great to learn some skills, how to approach them as their new boss, and how to keep their motivation high.

Uncertainty breeds fear. If we take a look at Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs, engagement can only happen after the first few levels are satisfied.

To get your team to a place of engagement and motivation, I would recommend approaching your team with open communication and transparency. Schedule a series of 1:1 meetings with each of your new reports to get to know them. Listen to their concerns and get to know the lay of the land. Then show them you’ve listened through your actions. Lay out your vision in a clear and transparent way that is shared with everyone in 1:1 meetings and again in a team session.

Stay tuned for next Tuesday’s lecture, “National Culture,” where you’ll gain the knowledge and tools for working with varied cultures around the world.

First time hearing about Bee School? It’s not too late to sign up! Reserve your spot below for this free educational series and we can email you the sessions you missed.
bee school is in session

Bee School is in Session!

Today marks the launch our first educational series, Bee School, designed to help managers lead their teams and operate successful companies. This initiative is our spin on business school, taught by renowned MBA professor and senior management expert, Dr. Linda Herkenhoff.

Although classes start today, it’s not too late to enroll for free. If you missed today’s session you can still sign up and we will email you the recording. This is your chance to receive a postgraduate education without the cost!

Our mission to pave the future of work for non-desk workers and those who manage them is at the core of why we started Bee School. Over the span of six weeks, course participants will gain valuable insights on how to keep employees motivated and engaged at work, as well as how to build and navigate inclusive work cultures.

See the full details, including the schedule and curriculum.

Are you ready to take the next step in becoming a proactive, organized, and motivational leader? Reserve your spot below for this free educational series.
Beekeeper "Future of the Non-Desk Workforce" Panel Featured in Huffington Post

Beekeeper “Future of the Non-Desk Workforce” Panel Featured in Huffington Post

On October 10th we hosted a “Future of the Non-Desk Workforce” panel discussion to accompany our big announcement of the Beekeeper Marketplace and custom integrations. The three panelists included two Beekeeper customers, Jennifer Pappas, Internal Communications Manager at Wireless Vision and Anja Luthje, Group Director of Rooms and Quality at Mandarin Oriental Hotel Group, and experience design expert Sarah Deane at EffectUX.

marketplace panelists

From big data to organizational culture, these industry leaders shared their insights on where they see the future of non-desk workers in the next five years and what they are doing now to arm their employees with tools that will help their business maintain a competitive edge as we move into a new era. They discussed the real value of big data, AI, cybersecurity, nextgen internal communications, and the operational impact of the digital workplace.

Following the event, Sarah Deane expanded on key topics from the panel discussion in an article for the Huffington Post called “Culture, A.I., and the Non-Desk Workforce.”

About the Author

As the Founder of EffectUX, Sarah Deane is a thought leader in the space of Experience, having written a UX primer and how-to in 2014, presented at SXSW on the topic of Workplace Experience: UX, Technology, and Humans, as well as frequently writing on the Huffington Post and Business Value Exchange. At EffectUX, Sarah guides and creates Index algorithms and success models, a process which has been recognized by IDG (2016) for the process of measuring experience.

Before founding EffectUX, Sarah served in Experience Design Leadership roles and has grown and managed CX and UX teams. She built the first Global IT 360 Experience Lab during her tenure at HP. She has a Masters in Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence with a concentration on algorithm design, data modeling, and computer vision.

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I was recently honored to participate in a panel at Beekeeper’s announcement of their integrated workplace feature, alongside Jennifer Pappas (Internal Communications Manager at Wireless Vision), Anja Luthje (Group Director Rooms and Quality for Mandarin Oriental Hotel Group), and facilitated by Beekeepers VP Corey McCarthy.

The theme was all about the hot-topic of culture, A.I and especially how they impacted the non-desk workforce. There were lots of great food-for-thought, so we wanted to share a summary of a few of them as they may be helpful for those that are working on digitizing or engaging their non-desk workforce.